New Procedure To Revolutionise Blood Pressure Treatment

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Director of Monash University’s Centre of Cardiovascular Research and Education in Therapeutics, Professor Henry Krum, led the research collaboration around this study. The new technique, called percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation, involves disrupting the nerves around the kidney that sends signals to the brain and kidneys to drive up blood pressure. There were no major short or long-term safety issues associated with the procedure. The World Health Organisation estimates that hypertension affects around 40 per cent of adults aged 25 and over and is responsible for 7.5 million deaths a year worldwide. It is a risk factor for heart disease – the leading cause of death in Australia – and a number of other conditions including, stroke, heart failure, renal impairment and visual impairment. Professor Krum said now that the procedure could be safely introduced into the clinic, it would save lives and improve quality of life for hypertension sufferers.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-procedure-revolutionise-blood-pressure-treatment.html

Flaxseed may reduce blood pressure, early findings show

There was no flaxseed-related benefit for people with normal blood pressure, however. Flaxseed costs about 25 to 50 cents per ounce. The new study was partially funded by the Flax Council of Canada. It wasn’t originally designed to study blood pressure, which means the results have to be interpreted with more caution. “The study results are indeed surprising – it is actually hard to imagine such huge reductions in blood pressure with flax seed mixed in food stuffs,” Dr. William B.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/01/us-flaxseed-bp-idUSBRE9A00R520131101

Blood Pressure Swings Could Be Linked to Mental Decline: Study

Symptom Checker: Your Guide to Symptoms & Signs: Pinpoint Your Pain

Blood pressure medications can reduce fluctuations and lower the risk of cardiovascular events, stroke and, some studies suggest, decline in mental function, he added. “Physicians and patients with hypertension should increase focus on keeping blood pressure levels consistently at goal levels minimizing, to the extent possible, fluctuations in blood pressure,” Fonarow said. To gauge the effect of blood pressure changes on mental ability, Mooijaart’s team collected data on more than 5,400 men and women, aged 70 to 82, who took part in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk. That study, conducted by centers in Ireland, Scotland and the Netherlands, looked at whether lowering cholesterol protected people at risk for heart disease.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=172192

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Vitamins To Boost Immunity

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Vitamins – Introduction

Inadequate magnesium intake contributes to fatigue and decreases immunity. Magnesium also dilates and relaxes the skeletal muscles of the body and the smooth muscles of the vascular system. This enhances blood flow throughout the body and thus the distribution of white blood cells through the bloodstream. Brent Barlow is a Naturopathic Physician practicing at The Kelowna Wellness Clinic in downtown Kelowna.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.castanet.net/news/Natural-Health-News/101950/Vitamins-to-boost-immunity

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The RDA is gradually being replaced by a new standard called the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI). The DRI represents a shift in nutritional emphasis — from preventing deficiencies to lowering risks of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. The DRI values comprise four categories: The recommended dietary allowance (RDA). This is the current rating on most vitamins. The estimated average requirement (EAR).
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.healthcentral.com/ency/408/guides/000039_1.html

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